Our Hearts are Beating Together but We Do Not Feel It

Recently, an image of a little boy’s body washed ashore sparked a boiling debate around the world and forced many to be aware of the migration issues currently burning down Europe. The picture turned into an icon for this new wave of refugees. Germany is currently a popular choice for the migrants since the country “waived EU rules”. During the weekend, about 40000 more migrants are expected to pour in. Thousands of Syrian refugees have been “making their way from Turkey, through the Balkans and Hungary to reach Austria, Germany and Sweden”. Throughout this chaos, residents across Europe actively participated in giving either peaceful demonstration to welcome the refugees or violent protests against them, several of which have been banned. Austrian Chancellor, Werner Faymann, furiously criticized Hungary’s “decision to place migrants on a train after leading them to believe they were heading for the Austrian border when they were in fact destined for a processing camp in Hungary”. Doesn’t this situation sound eerily familiar?

I often try to pull my mind out of my current location and send it stretching across the world like an invisible film; consequently, I gain a better understanding of my place on Earth. It is so easy to be limited to our own views by our visual data input: we perceive what we currently see as relevant and realistic, while everything else ceases to exist with meaning. Our hearts are beating together, some are slower while others faster, some just stopped while others just started. However we do not feel it. We do not feel the rhythm, because our senses are often overridden by our eyes. When I sit on a tranquil, sunny morning writing this blog, thousands of refugees are rushing to make the border of European nations before their presence will be marked as “illegal” by the authorities sitting in their office. The moment their feet scramble out of their door steps in desperation, their identity is uprooted and erased and the sense of certainty that humans oh so instinctively crave is gone.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-34231905

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