Poem Analysis

The Big Question:

The writer’s point in “When I Have Fears”: Reflecting to the past and fears that he has not lived his life to the fullest.

Devices: –   Simile from “Before high-pilèd books, in charactery, Hold like rich garners the full ripened grain;”

  • Personification from “night’s starred face” and “magic hand of chance”

Structure: – Rhyming: ABCBDEDEFGFGHH

– Punctuation: The dash in “Never have relish in the faery power/

Of unreflecting love—then on the shore

Of the wide world I stand alone,”

  • Whole poem is one long sentence and one stanza.

Sound devices: – Alliteration in “wide world”

The writer’s point in “Mezzo Cammin”: Thinking about the past initially makes him feel that he has not fulfilled his life goals.

Devices: – Metaphor compares the Past to a city he sees from a hill

  • Imagery describes the city in “A city in the twilight dim and vast,/With smoking roofs, soft bells, and gleaming lights”
  • The thunder symbolizes Death

Structure: – 2 long sentences with dashes in the second part

  • Entire poem is one stanza

Sound devices: – “Cataract” is cacophony

OUTLINE:

I. Introduction: Thesis: In poems “When I Have Fears” and “Mezzo Cammin”, the authors conveys their concerns for the

II. The authors create vivid images to illustrate the past.

  • Imagery describes the city in “A city in the twilight dim and vast,/With smoking roofs, soft bells, and gleaming lights” (Longfellow l. 11-12).
  • Imagery and simile describes the imagined past accomplishments in ”
    efore high-pilèd books, in charactery,
       Hold like rich garners the full ripened grain;
    When I behold, upon the night’s starred face,
       Huge cloudy symbols of a high romance,” (Keats l. 3-6).
  • Personification from “night’s starred face” and “magic hand of chance” (Keats l. 5 and 8).

III. Keats and Longfellow play with sound to create a serious tone when describing the end of their time.

  • Alliteration in “wide world” (Keats): wailing sound
    • “Sounds and sights” (Longfellow): signing sound
  • Cacophony in “cataract” (Longfellow): illustrates thunder’s magnificence

IV. The authors use similar structures to show the passage of time and their sadness.

  • Rhyming of each poem
  • Long syntax, with dashes (quotes see above)
  • Parallel structure: “And think…”, “And when…” (Keats)
    • “Nor indolence, nor pleasure, nor the fret” (Longfellow)

V. Conclusion

 

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